Shoot 'em Up

 

 

In a music video co-directed by Terry Duthu and Kevin Phillips, a male front man in tight pants and a fur jacket jumps and thrashes through a rusted out junkyard while pink paint and white feathers fly through the air behind him; Asian schoolgirls with glowing eyes shoot menacing glares while grease-and-mud-covered girls writhe and squirm. In other words, this isn’t your average Kylie Minogue video.

Fans of the lithe blonde Australian singer—largely known for her 2001 dance anthem “Can’t Get You Out of My Head”—have grown accustomed to seeing Minogue herself writhing and bumping to her poppy, infectious beats. But the London-based Radar Festival invited budding directors from around the world to submit their own interpretation of Minogue’s, and other artist’s, music. Out of 16 different artists, Duthu and Phillips selected Minogue’s song “Slow,” and out of countless other applicants, Minogue’s label, Parlophone, handpicked the two SCAD alum’s video as the leader of the pack.

Described by Phillips and Duthu, along with the video’s producer and fellow SCAD graduate Trey Hock, as an “apocalyptic wasteland,” the video depicts a showdown between the band, a living painting and three elementary school girls. According to the Radar Festival, all the videos were evaluated on cinematography, editing, overall structure, relevance to track and originality. The three filmmakers recently attended the award ceremony to receive their award, and will soon learn if they have also won the popular vote, as
selected by the general public; they will also find out whether Parlophone and three other partnering companies opt to commission them for more film work.
 Phillips and Duthu say they plan to travel extensively screening their winning video. “We’re going to submit the video to a bunch of festivals and try to get as much attention drawn to it as humanly possible,” Duthu says. “Our plan is to make sure everybody knows about us.” And with an endorsement from the pop star herself, what more could a trio of budding filmmakers need?