Savannah's Cinematic Son – Stratton Leopold

stratton leopold – photo: bob jones

 

Savannah's Cinematic Son – Stratton Leopold

Savannah's Cinematic Son Stratton Leopold sat down with South before the debut of his latest production credit, the Benicio Del Toro-let "The Wolfman" in late 2009.

Featured in Faces of the South: The Trilogy Edition now on newsstands. Click here to order your copy of Faces today. 

 
South Magazine: What new projects do you have in store for us?
Stratton Leopold: We've been working on The Wolfman at Universal with Anthony Hopkins, Benicio Del Toro and Emily Blunt. It's faithful to the classic laughing picture, The Wolf Man (1941). 
 
SM: What is the main difference between the original Wolf Man and your version, The WolfMan
SL: It's in color. [laughs] We're fairly faithful to the story line: It's still 1890s London. I think it's probably the special effects. Before, the original film kind of cuts a lot. Now, with visual effects, we can morph people. Although, you start getting concerned about remaking a classic because some people like the fact that the first one was black and white. It's a challenge in marketing, sometimes, to remake a classic – something I found out when I did Born Yesterday.
 
SM: What's the key to making a movie really frightening these days?
SL: I think it's the same as it always has been. I often tell directors, "What an audience doesn't see on the screen is more frightening than what they see on the screen." We can do these effects – we can make things look real – but the audience's mind is even greater than that. 
 
SM: What is your favorite scary movie?
SL: When I was a little kid, and I saw The Day the Earth Stood Still. It scared the hell out of me. Of course, it got remade with Tom Cruise later, but my memory of the original – I didn't want to go to sleep.
 
SM: On a scale of 1 to 10, how scary is The Wolfman?
SL: I gotta say it's a 10, of course. [laughs] It's some decent story behind it: Really, it's a love story.