Dr. John DeVaro, Dr. Elizabeth Bennett / Children’s Eye Institute of Savannah

Children's Eye Institute of Savannah provides a full spectrum of pediatric eye care, from premature infant eye exams to a first eyeglasses exam/contact lens fitting to eye muscle and pediatric cataract surgery.

Photo / D. Paul Graham

Children’s Eye Institute of Savannah provides a full spectrum of pediatric eye care, from premature infant eye exams to a first eyeglasses exam/contact lens fitting to eye muscle and pediatric cataract surgery.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT PRACTICING MEDICINE?

Dr. John M DeVaro: I cherish the doctor-patient / doctor-parent relationship. When a pediatric specialist and a parent work together as a team, we can make a huge difference in the development and well-being of a child who will carry on long after we are gone. What is better than that?

Dr. Elizabeth N. Bennett: I look forward to being able to make a positive impact on the future of a child through their vision. Knowing they are able to see to learn and assisting them in that process is an honor. I discovered Optometry as a career my junior year in college after my mother had an eye exam and described the process to me. It is a perfect combination of medicine, optics, and personal interactions.

NEWEST, LATEST AND GREATEST

Dr. JD: We are using low-dose atropine eye drops at bedtime and special contact lenses called MiSight contacts to help slow down and prevent the progression of nearsightedness in kids.

Dr. EB: There are also new amblyopia treatments that can improve vision without patching. Revitalvision is one such cloud-based digital technology that we offer for children over the age of nine which can improve vision by two lines.

DEFINING MOMENTS

Dr. JD: My fellowship in pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus at the Duke University Eye Center exposed me to an enormous amount of pathology and surgical experience. While some techniques and approaches to clinical care have changed since then, my desire to concentrate on pediatric ophthalmology was solidified during my training at Duke.

Dr. EB: During my residency I was given the opportunity to volunteer with an organization, Cornerstone Jamaica. With that organization, we were able to provide comprehensive eye exams to school children in Jamaica. Being able to provide eye care and glasses to kids that otherwise may never receive an eye exam was an eye opening experience. It was a gateway into seeing the true impact it can make in a child’s future and solidified my passion to work with children.

WHAT IS A COMMON MISCONCEPTION IN YOUR FIELD?

Dr. JD: Blue light blocking glasses. The American Academy of Ophthalmology does not recommend blue light blocking glasses because of the lack of scientific evidence that blue light is damaging to the eyes. The Academy points out that the greatest source of blue light that humans are exposed to is the sun, not screen time

Learn more about Drs. John DeVaro and Elizabeth Bennett and the Children’s Eye Institute of Savannah:
Savannah, GA • 912.353-1001 / ceisav.com

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