Author: Abigail Moise

#PlaySouth: Savannah Water Lantern Festival

Run out of creative date night ideas? For one night only, the fast-growing Water Lantern Festival, voted number one by USA Today for “Best Cultural Festival,” will be held in Savannah…

#PLAYSOUTH Savannah Comic Con

Headed for its ninth annual comic book and gaming extravaganza, Savannah Comic Con, “the only locally owned comic con,” is gearing up for the last weekend of July…

Everhart’s Saints of the South

“There wasn’t one note of singing while women hung out the wash, no chatting over fences, no children shouting in play, not one chant of the alphabet from the schoolroom; silent were the swishing of brooms in yards and absent were the fragrant smells from cook pots…the camp had quietly died, its lifeblood withdrawing, the same way blood withdraws to the center of the body when dying.”

Georgia on Our Mind

Georgia film is back in business, and we’ve got our thumb on the pulse and the down-low on what’s coming up.

2022 Guide to St. Patrick’s Day in Savannah

The St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Savannah is back in 2022! After two cancellations due to COVID-19, Savannahians have eagerly awaited the return of the second largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the country. Let’s turn Savannah a little greener than usual this March. Erin go Bragh!

The Haunted South

Stories of encounters with spirits are as much a part of the Coastal South as Spanish moss and iced tea, but the true chills and thrills are deeper than the retelling of famous tales. Local paranormal investigators and tours recall their profound experiences investigating haunted Savannah and Charleston and their encounters with the ghosts you have never heard of.

Living a Balanced Life

Not having time should not be an excuse to put off living your best life. These two busy-bodies have the formula to living a healthy, balanced life.

4 Historical Haunts in Savannah & Charleston

The South is famous, or perhaps infamous, for its deep history of hauntings and paranormal activity. It’s believed that some locals have decided to stick around the Lowcountry for a century or two while other spirits simply remain, restless from their tragic fate.